Category: open

  • When It’s Fun to Grade

    When It’s Fun to Grade

    This morning I was grading work for a 2-credit, half-semester course I teach called Cluster Learning Springboard. While going from one assignment to the next, I suddenly realized I was having an emotion I don’t usually associate with grading: joy. It was legitimately fun to see what the students had created. If you are a…

  • Supporting Openness Should Not Mean Supporting Piracy

    Supporting Openness Should Not Mean Supporting Piracy

    The Internet Archive has decided to respond to the corona virus crisis by creating what they call the National Emergency Library, and they have gained publicity from the likes of Jill Lepore at The New Yorker, from NPR, and from lots of people who support open access projects, open educational resources, etc. But we should…

  • Openings

    Openings

    Recently, I’ve been working with some faculty in thinking about Open Pedagogy, Open Education, and syllabi. There have been great, productive conversations, and lots of good questions. But as people have begun to head back to classes, there has also been a noticeable concern about realities versus ideals. As I discuss syllabi with people, one…

  • Resources and Regeneration

    Resources and Regeneration

    This past week, I attended the third Northeast OER (Open Educational Resources) Summit at UMass Amherst. (For a general report on that, see Matt Reed’s write-up for Inside Higher Ed, or, for a whole variety of views, check out the Twitter hashtag #NEOERSummit2019.) I presented a 25-minute talk titled “Gift Economies in the Gig Economy:…

  • Of Margins, Refuge, and Struggle

    Of Margins, Refuge, and Struggle

    This post began as a reflection on some ideas that Robin DeRosa offered in one part of her recent keynote address for the AMICAL Conference in Cairo. It may be helpful look at the transcript or video of the “Frankenstein’s Margins” section of the keynote to understand some of the context here. (Like most informal…

  • The “Textbooks” Misnomer

    The “Textbooks” Misnomer

    The other day I explained to a student that the “cc” field in emails is a holdover from the days of typewriters, when a “carbon copy” was literally a copy made with carbon paper. Similarly, “dialing” a telephone number (and then “hanging up”) or “taping” a show. And of course the common symbol for saving…

  • Known, Needed, Cared For

    Known, Needed, Cared For

    When I was a high school teacher, we had a leader who told us that a successful institution is one where everybody in the community feels known, needed, and cared for. It’s a simple concept that, if taken seriously, has revolutionary potential. Indeed, it’s one of the most powerful ideas I’ve ever encountered in education.…

  • How Public? Why Public?

    How Public? Why Public?

    In the Interdisciplinary Studies program where I have begun working, we encourage students to go public with their work. It’s a common idea well beyond interdisciplinary studies: for students to feel more engaged with the work they do, to feel that what they are doing matters, they need to do that work for an audience…

  • Open Scholarship in Neoliberal Times

    Open Scholarship in Neoliberal Times

    “Many researchers long for change,” an article at OpenUP Hub states, adding that such researchers “may desire to publish in new formats; to separate results from methodology and analysis in peer review; to consider qualitative output evaluations; to spread their research as far as possible through open repositories; to integrate communication as an ‘on-the-fly’ instead…